Sayyid Amiruddin

Deputy of Mawlana Shaykh Nazim al-Qubrusi. Initiated by the Masters of Wisdom – Khwajagan

Bloodline & Family Lineage

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“Allah only desires to keep away uncleanness from you, O people of the House! and to purify you a (thorough) purifying” – Quran 33:33

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Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s paternal grandfather Lord Nawab Lt. Colonel Sayyid Mohammed Amir ud-Din with H.E.H. the Nizam of Hyderabad Mir Osman Ali Khan Siddiqui Asaf Jah VII and H.M. King Saud bin Abdulaziz Al Saud the King of Saudi Arabia in Shahamanzil Palace, at Hyderabad on December 5, 1955. In the picture Lord Nawab Lt. Colonel Sayyid Mohammed Amir ud-Din is standing immediately behind H.M. King Saud bin Abdulaziz Al Saud.

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Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s paternal grandfather Lord Nawab Lt. Colonel Sayyid Mohammed Amir ud-Din, Military Secretary of H.E.H the Nizam (far right) with H.E.H. Mir Osman Ali Khan Siddiqui Asaf Jah VII, Nizam of Hyderabad, and Jawaharlal Nehru at the King Kothi Palace, Hyderabad.

See, Military Records from Lord Nawab Lt. Colonel Sayyid Mohammed Amiruddin’s Service to H.E.H. the Nizam of Hyderabad

Eleanor Roosevelt with the world’s wealthiest monarch, H.E.H. Asaf Jah VII the Nizam of Hyderabad on March 16, 1952. Behind Mrs. Roosevelt (far left in official head dress) is Lord Nawab Lt. Colonel Sayyid Mohammed Amir ud-Din, Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s paternal grandfather, the Military Secretary to H.E.H. the Nizam of Hyderabad.

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Eleanor Roosevelt with Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s paternal grandfather Lord Nawab Lt. Colonel Sayyid Mohammed Amir ud-Din, Military Secretary of H.E.H. Asaf Jah VII, the Nizam of Hyderabad

Paternal Descent from Iraq’s Arabian Husaynid Royalty & Hasanid Aristocracy

img_103831:14 “And We have enjoined on man (to be good) to his parents: in travail upon travail did his mother bear him, and in years twain was his weaning: (hear the command), “Show gratitude to Me and to thy parents: to Me is (thy final) Goal.”

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A preserved fragment of Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s original paternal family tree written on parchment, tracing his descent back to al-Imam Hasan al-Askari (‘alaihi salam).

Fragments from Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s paternal family tree displayed by the Office of the Naqib al-Ashraf of Samarqand and Bukhara from original scans they received from him.

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Official pedigree documentation from the Office of the Naqib al-Ashraf of Samarqand and Bukhara of paternal ancestral relatives of Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin who migrated from Samarra, Iraq to Bukhara & Samarqand whose lineage traced back to Iraq’s Arabian Husaynid royalty: the eleventh biological dynasty of Ahl al-Bayt, the House of Imam Hasan al-Askari (‘alaihi salam)

History

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Qasr al-‘Ashiq (medieval name: al-Ma’shuq – ‘The Beloved’) or Palace of the Beloved built between 870-882 in Samarra, Iraq. Given 861-870 were the years of the “Anarchy at Samarra” and Mu’tamid (reign 870-892) was under Turkish house arrest during the vast majority of his symbolic reign, it is highly unlikely Mu’tamid, who also failed an attempted desperate escape from Samarra as caliph in 882 could have constructed this palace. It is more likely it was built for Imam Hasan al-Askari (d.874), the 11th Imam, or his father Imam ‘Ali al-Hadi (d.868), the grandson and generational heir to Imam ‘Ali al-Rida; the Crown Prince of the Abbasid Empire during Ma’mun’s reign.

Honorific Style 

By most historic accounts, Imam Hasan al-Askari was born in Medina on the 10th of Rabi al-Akhir 232 Hijri (846 AD) and died in Samarra on the 8th of Rabi al-Awwal 260 Hijri (874 AD) aged 28 years.

Samarra (Sur Man Ra’) was a military city about 60 miles north of Baghdad and the new capital of the Abbasid empire. The word ‘Askar’ in Arabic is used for an military. Imam Hasan b. ‘Ali b. Muhammad was conferred the honorific style al-Askari by the caliph because he commanded a large private military of lancers and swords men. According to most historians, the Imam’s private military was the largest in the empire, and his influence exceeded that of the caliph, who was confined to house arrest by the Turks for most of his reign.

Descendants

The history of the descendants of Imam Hasan al-Askari (d. 874) is shrouded in great mystery and accordingly, has of recent been either outright denied due to ignorance or simply intentionally concealed. Unrelated official historic family tree documents kept in renowned Sayyid families and even in the offices of the Naqib al-Ashraf, from Hejaz, to Iran, Bukhara, Samarqand, Afghanistan, the Mughal Empire, Yemen, Somalia and Egypt have traced the descent of thousands of Sayyids over multiple generations back to Imam Hasan al-Askari.

The following traditions are shared from Sunni and Shiite hadith narratives and neutral academic sources to share with guests some historic record of the existence of a continuous line of descent from al-Imam Hasan al-Askari in addition to that of his eldest son and successor al-Imam Muhammad al-Mahdi al-Muntadhar.

According to the earliest reports as cited below from official family tree documents and records cited by multiple historians like Kashani, Arbali, Sahib Kashf ul-Ghumma, and Sahib Siraj al-Ansab among others, Imam Hasan al-Askari fathered six illustrious children: Imam Muhammad al-Mahdi ‘alaihi salam, Musa, Ja’far, Ibrahim, Fatima, Ayesha, and ‘Ali, sometimes referred to as Asghar. It is said Musa b. Hasan al-Askari passed away before the age of maturity. Some of these narrations are as follows:

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Although some contemporary Shiite historians now generally dismiss the classical narrative which states Imam Hasan al-Askari fathered children other than Imam Muhammad al-Mahdi, whose birth was also concealed, and who was also not mentioned in any legal will document of the Imam nor was granted inheritance of the estate of his father after he left the world, the Shiite hadith book Usul al-Kafi, in Bab Mawlid Abi Muhammad al-Hasan b. ‘Ali confirms Imam Hasan al-Askari had multiple maidens with whom he had relations. In his Usul, al-Kafi writes:

“When the caliph got news of Imam Hasan ‘Askari’s illness, he instructed his agents to keep a constant watch over the house of the Imam…he sent some of these midwives to examine the slave girls of the Imam to determine if they were pregnant. If a woman was found pregnant she was detained and imprisoned…”[al-Kafi, by Muhammad Ya’qub Kulayni. Translated by Muhammad Sarwar. Chap. 124, Birth of Abi Muhammad al-Hasan ibn ‘Ali, p.705]

Additionally, there is mention of descendants of Imam Hasan al-Askari by Sunni traditionalists. In one of his lectures on the lives of Ahl al-Bayt, the renowned Sunni Sufi scholar Shaykh al-Islam Dr. Tahir ul-Qadri cites a text confirming the opinion Imam Hasan al-Askari also fathered a daughter named Ayesha. Dr. Qadri states, “Now we arrive at the mention of Imam Hasan al-Askari…he also had a daughter, she was a princess and her name was Ayesha.” [‘Imam Hasan al-Askari had a Daughter Named Ayesha’. Dr. Tahir ul-Qadri]

Furthermore, it is related in Kulayani’s Usul al-Kafi, in his last days when al-Imam Hasan al-Askari was ill he appointed his mother as the executer of his will so that she could manage his affairs after his death. This matter was officially approved by the Abbasid court. In this will, there was no mention of any offspring, including Imam Muhammad al-Mahdi. Imam Hasan al-Askari’s estate was subsequently divided between his mother and his brother. This tradition establishes for start that al-Imam Hasan al-Askari intentionally concealed the existence of his offspring, whether one, or more. [Usul al-Kafi, Bab Mawlid Abi Muhammad al-Hasan b.’Ali]

Additionally, according to Shaykh Saduq in his Kamal al-Din, after his death, al-Imam Hasan al-Askari’s mother entered into a dispute with Ja’far al-Zaki, his brother, over the estate of Imam Hasan al-Askari. The matter was referred to the Abbasid caliph, and to further complicate matters, one of the maidens of Imam Hasan al-Askari by the name of Sayqal came forward and claimed to be pregnant. Sayqal was brought to the palace of the Abbasid caliph, Mu’tamid, and was kept under strict guard and under the watchful eyes of the midwives and other women in the palace to determine the fate of her pregnancy. At that very time, political turmoil as a consequence of the insurrection led by Saffar, the death of ‘Abd Allah b. Yahya, and the revolution of the Zanj engulfed the caliphal state. The Abbasids were forced to abandon Samarra. Hence, they became occupied with their own troubles and gave up the surveillance of Sayqal’s pregnancy. [Kamal al-Din, Vol. 2, p. 149]

According to the Bihar, al-Imam Hasan al-Askari had several maidens with different names. On two occasions Hakima Khatun, his paternal aunt, has mentioned these maidens. At one time she came to visit al-Imam Hasan al-Askari and saw him seated in the courtyard of his house, surrounded by his maidens. She asked him: “Which one of these girls is going to be the mother of your successor?” The Imam replied: “It is Sawsan.” [Bihar al-anwar, Vol. 51, p. 17]

In another report Hakima Khatun relates the event of the birth of the twelfth Imam, cited earlier, in which al-Imam Hasan al-Askari requests her to spend the night of 15th Sha’ban (255 AH/870 CE) in his house because a child was going to be born. At that point Hakima asked him: “Which of your maidens is the mother of the child?” The Imam said: “It is Narjis.” Hakima said: “Yes, I too like her the most among your maidens.” [Bihar al-anwar, Vol. 51, p. 25]

According to the Bihar: One of the companions of Imam Hasan al-Askari by the name of Ibrahim b. Idris relates that the Imam sent him a sheep with a message that he should sacrifice it for the latter’s having performed the ceremony of shaving off his child’s birth hair (‘aqiqa), and share the meat with his family. Ibrahim carried out the Imam’s order. But when he came to see him the Imam said: “Our child has passed.” However, once again he sent Ibrahim two sheep with a letter in which the Imam instructed Ibrahim: In the Name of God, the Merciful, the Compassionate. Sacrifice these sheep for your master’s ceremony of ‘aqiqa and eat the meat with your family. Ibrahim carried out the order. But when he came to see the Imam the latter did not mention anything about it. [Bihar al-anwar, Vol. 51, p. 22]

Traditionally, one sheep is sacrificed when a daughter is born, and two when a son is born.

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Qasr al-‘Ashiq (al-Ma’shuq) or Palace of the Beloved built between 870-882 in Samarra, Iraq

Delhi Sultanate 

In his book “The Caste System of Northern India with Special Reference to the United Provinces of Agra and Oudh” published by Oxford University Press in 1931, on page 186 Sir Edward Arthur Henry Blunt documented the various branches of the Sayyid families who migrated to the Delhi Sultanate. This documentation included descendants of Imam Hasan al-Askari.

Blunt, E. A. H. (1931). The Caste System of Northern India with Special Reference to the United Provinces of Agra and Oudh. P. 186. London: Oxford University Press.

In her book “Pain and Grace: A Study of Two Mystical Writers of Eighteenth-Century Muslim India” p. 32, Dr. Annemarie Schimmel writes: “Khwaja Mir Dard’s family, like many nobles, from Bukhara; led their pedigree back to Baha’uddin Naqshband, after whom the Naqshbandi order is named, and who was a descendant, in the 13th generation of the 11th…imam al-Hasan al-Askari.”

In the Islamic Republic of Iran a research paper was authored in 2013 by the title: AN EXPLORATION IN THE FIELD OF IMAM HASAN ASKARI’S SONS- AND THE AUTHENTICITY OF A SHRINE ATTRIBUTED TO HIM. This paper was published in the Journal: ENTIZAR E MOUD in the Fall of 2013, Volume 13, Number 42; Page(s) 97 To 125. The paper tries to verify the attribution of an offspring to Imam Hasan Askari with a descriptive-analytic method besides Imam Muhammad al-Mahdi. The very existence of such a study makes apparent the Islamic Republic of Iran is also home to nobles among the Sayyids whose ancestors claimed descent from Imam Hasan al-Askari.

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The above examples demonstrate the existence of unrelated nobles throughout the old Muslim world who possessed independent family trees that traced their biological lineage back to al-Imam Hasan al-Askari.

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Bloodline & Family Lineage  

Like the venerable Khwaja Moin al-Din Chisti Ajmeri and Khwaja Baha al-Din Shah Naqshband Bukhari, Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin is a direct lineal descendant of the House of the Prophet sallallahu alaihi wa sallam on his paternal side through the eleventh dynasty of Ahl al-Bayt; from the House of al-Imam Hasan al-Askari ‘alaihi salam. Among Sayyid’s ancestors in this line is also al-Imam Ja’far al-Sadiq, progenitor of the Fatimid Empire of Egypt and his grandson al-Imam ‘Ali ibn Musa al-Rida ‘alaihi salam. Al-Imam al-Rida was the Crown Prince of the Abbasid Empire and the declared successor to the the seventh Abbasid caliph Ma’mun al-Rashid. Ma’mun al-Rashid was the first documented Arab king in post ancient-Egyptian history to enter the Great Pyramids of Giza. In the year 202 AH, Imam ‘Ali al-Rida was officially declared Crown Prince of the Abbasid Empire and currency was subsequently minted with the name of al-Imam al-Rida. According to the book “The Life of the Imam ‘Ali bin Musa al Rida” by Sharif al-Qurashi, the inscription on the coins read; “Allah, Mohammed is Allah’s Messenger, al-Ma’mu`n is the vicegerent of Allah, of what the Emir al-Rida, the regent over the Muslims, ‘Ali b. Mu`sa` b. ‘Ali b. Abu` Ta`lib has commanded.

AdditionallySayyid Ahmed Amiruddin descends from the Imam and Caliph al-Hasan ibn ‘Ali ibn Abi Talib from his maternal grandmother, through her paternal descent from Sultan ul-Awliya Ghawth al-Adham al-Sayyid al-Sharif Shaykh Abi Muhammad ‘Abd al-Qadir al-Jilani.

In summary, according to his paternal and maternal family tree documentation, Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin descends from eleven of the twelve Imams from Iraq’s Arabian Husaynid royalty and from Iraq’s Arabian Hasanid aristocracy through the House of Sayyidina Shaykh ‘Abd al-Qadir al-Jilani.

Feudal Lords & Recognized Nobility

(Left to Right) Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s paternal great great great grandfather Secunder Yar Jang II Lord Nawab Sayyid Munir-ud-din titled Khan Asaf Jahi, Jagirdar, Taluqdar, Subedar, then his son, Karim Yar Jang Lord Nawab Sayyid Karim-ud-din titled Khan Asaf Jahi, Jagirdar, then his son, Lord Nawab Sayyid Farid-ud-din titled Khan Asaf Jahi then his son, Lord Nawab Lt. Col. Sayyid Mohammed Amir ud-Din titled Khan, the Military Secretary to H.E.H. Asaf Jah VII the Nizam of Hyderabad.

His Highness the Nizam of Hyderabad Mir Mahbub Ali Khan Siddiqui Asaf Jah VI

Secunder Yar Jang II Lord Nawab Sayyid Munir ud-Din Khan Asaf Jahi, Taluqdar (back right) with his great grandson Lord Nawab Lt. Colonel Sayyid Mohammed Amir ud-Din Khan Asaf Jahi, the paternal grandfather of Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin seated with his arms crossed, as a boy. Secunder Yar Jang II Lord Nawab Sayyid Munir-ud-din Khan Asaf Jahi is mentioned by name in the book “Hyderabad State List of Leading Officials, Nobles and Personages” published by Hyderabad Residency Government Press.

On page 59 of the book “Tulasī kī sāhitya-sādhanā: The Legacy of the Nizams”, published by the H.E.H The Nizam’s Urdu Trust Hyderabad, author Lallana Rāya writes of the relationship between Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s ancestor Secunder Yar Jang II Lord Nawab Sayyid Munir ud-Din Khan Asaf Jahi and the King of Hyderabad, His Highness Mir Mahbub Ali Khan Siddiqi, stating Lord Nawab Sayyid Munir ud-Din was a teacher of occult ritual to the King.

Raya writes: “(The King) Mir Mahboob Ali Khan was known to possess healing power for snake bite. With his spell, it is said that the venom of the snake would abate. It was his order that if anyone from the public had a snake bite, he could approach him…It is said that Feudal Lord Nawab Muneeruddin Khan Taluqdar who knew this spell, taught the mantra to Mir Mahboob Ali Khan. When a man suffered from a snake bite, the name of the Mahboob Ali had to be mentioned in these terms: “Mahboob Ali Pasha Ki Dohaee”. Then, the venom would not spread further, or in other words, the venom of the snake would abate. Hence, the name of Mahboob Ali Pasha, and the practice of spell of snake bite became famous throughout Hyderabad.” [Tulasī kī sāhitya-sādhanā: The Legacy of the Nizams by Lallana Rāya, published by the H.E.H The Nizam’s Urdu Trust Hyderabad, 2002. p. 59].

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Asaf Jahi flag of Hyderabad State

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Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s great-grandfather Lord Nawab Sayyid Farid ud-Din Khan Asaf Jahi. Lord Nawab Sayyid Farid ud-Din was educated at The University of Edinburgh.

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Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s paternal great grandmother Helen Allen (Halima Farid ud-Din). Her brother Murray Allen was a minister of the Presbyterian Church in Scotland. She converted to Islam when she was 16 years old after dreaming of the Ka’aba and married his great grandfather Lord Nawab Syed Farid ud-Din Khan Asaf Jahi two years later while he was in Scotland. She followed the Qadiri Sufi Order, and was a Murid of Naqeeb al-Ashraaf fi Dar al-Islam Pir Syed Pir Ibrahim Saif al-Din al-Gilani of Baghdad, Iraq. She had spiritual association with Mawlana Abu Nasr, a Qadiri Sufi Saint and reknowned Majdhub from Baghdad, who lived in Hyderabad on a mountain top. She dreamt of the Holy Prophet (sallallahu alaihi wa sallam) more than 27 times, and claimed to have seen him while conscious during Hajj when she was in Madina tul-Munawwara.

The Fatimid Empire: Relation to Egypt’s Arabian Husaynid Royalty

Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s paternal grandmother Safia Ali Akbar.

Herself a descendant of al-Imam Ja’far al-Sadiq, the progenitor of the Fatimid Empire, although not a follower of the Ismaili religious school, Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s paternal grandmother the late Safia Ali Akbar daughter of the late Syed Ali Akbar, shared a great grandfather with Sir Sultan Muhammed Shah, Aga Khan III, GCSI, GCMG, GCIE, GCVO, PC, the 48th Imam of the Nizari Ismaili community. This makes Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin a fourth cousin of His Highness Prince Shah Karim Al Hussaini Aga Khan IV, the 49th Nizari Ismaili Imam.  His Highness Prince Shah Karim Al Hussaini Aga Khan VI is the current head of the Nizari line of pretenders to the throne of the Egyptian Arabian Husaynid monarchy of the Fatimid caliphs which ruled Egypt.

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India’s fifth President Fakhruddin Ali Ahmed (centre) in Hyderabad from New Delhi to congratulate Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s father Lord Nawab Sayyid Akram Abbas Khan (right) on his wedding day to Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s mother

Lord Nawab Lt. Colonel Sayyid Mohammed Amir-ud Din, grandfather of Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin at the age of 98 (Hijri), after Ramadan night prayers and the Khatm al-Khwajagan one month prior to his passing. Lord Nawab Amir ud-Din revealed to his grandchildren in a recorded message he was told by Imam al-Mahdi in a dream in the Arabic language that he was a ‘commander of his forces (jaish) ‘.

Maternal lineage: 

From his maternal grandmother, Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin is a Hasanid, and a 26th generation maternal descendent of Ghawth al-Adham Shaykh ‘Abd al-Qadir al-Jilani (may Allah be well pleased with him), the Founder of Tariqah Sufism. His lineage is as follows.  Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin, son of, Sayyida Fazal un-Nisa, daughter of, Sayyida Habib un-Nisa Mohammedi Qadiri, daughter of, Sayyid Shah Ahmad Badshah Qadiri al-Musawi,  son of, Sayyid Shah Pir Badshah Qadiri, son of, Sayyid Husayni Badshah Qadiri,  son of, Sayyid Shah Musa Qadiri, al-Musawi (Qadas Allahu Sirrah)  son of, Sayyid Muhiuddin Muhammad  son of, Sayyid Shah Darwaysh Muhiuddin Qadiri  son of, Sayyid Muhiuddin Qadiri son of, Sayyid Shah Ghulam Mohiuddin al-Qadiri (Pir Shah Mohiuddin Thani Qadiri)  son of, Sayyidul Abdaal Syed Shah ‘Abd al- Lateef Qadiri, Lawbali, al-Hamawi  son of, Syed Shah Taher,  son of, Syed Shah Sharfuddin Zahid Qadiri,  son of, Syed Kamaluddin Arif Qadiri al-Hamawi,  son of, Syed Shah Nasiruddin Hashim Qadiri,  son of, Syed Qutbuddin Muhammad,  son of, Syed Shabbuddin Ahmed,  son of, Syed Badruddin Hassan,  son of, Syed Shah Shaykh Alauddin Abul Hasan ‘Ali,  son of, Syed Shamsuddin Mohammed Thani,  son of, Syed Saifuddin Abu Zakariyya Yahya-Al- Hamawi Wa Baghdadi  son of, Syed Zaheeruddin al- Baghdadi,  son of, Syed Abu Nasr Shamsuddin,  son of, Syed Imaduddin Abi Saleh Nasr Qadiri,  son of, Syed Al Aqtab Sayyid Shah Tajuddin ‘Abdur Razack Qadiri,  son of, Qutb Al ‘Arifeen, Sayyid Al Mashriqayn, Naib Al Rasulullah, Arif Billahil Qaili Bi Amrillah ‘Qadami Hadhi ‘Ala Raqbati Kulli Waliyillahi, Imamul Awliya I Fakhal Asfiyai Ghawthus Samadani Ma’shuqir Rabbani Sahibish Sharia’ti Madanil Tariqati Wal Haqiqati Muhiyillahi Wad Din, Jaddina Wa Shaykhina Wa Sayyidina Wa Mawlana Sayyidina ‘Abd al-Qadir al Hasaniul Husayni, al-Ja’fari, al-Jilani (Radiallahu Ta’ala ‘anhu).

Hadrat Sayyid Shah Musa Qadiri qadasAllahu sirrahul 'aziz al-Hasani, maternal ancestor of Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin and a direct descendant of Ghawth al-Adham Shaykh 'Abd al-Qadir al-Jilani

Hadrat Sayyid Husayni Badshah Qadiri son of Hadrat Sayyid Shah Musa Qadiri al-Hasani qadasAllahu sirrahul ‘aziz (left), maternal ancestor of Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin and a direct descendant of Ghawth al-Adham Shaykh ‘Abd al-Qadir al-Jilani

Maternal Relative of the Royal House of Paigah, Hyderabad

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Official archives from court documentation of the blood relation through marriage between the paternal grandfather of Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s maternal grandmother Habib un-Nisa Mohammedi Begum and the Shams ul-Umarah family of the Royal House of Paigah, Hyderabad

The Royal House of Paigah was the senior aristocracy of Hyderabad State during the Asaf Jahi era. The Paigahs tended to be wealthier than the average Indian Maharaja, and each maintained his own court, his own extraordinary palaces, and his own private army.

Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s maternal ancestor Sayyid Husayni Badshah Qadiri’s son Pir Badshah Qadiri married Qamarunissa Begum, the only surviving biological descendant of Nawab Ghulam Imam Khan Imam ul-Mulk. Their son was Sayyid Ahmed Badshah Qadiri, the father of Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s maternal grandmother Habib un-Nisa Mohammedi Begum. Qamarunissa Begum was the first cousin of the Head of the Royal House of Paigah Shams ul-Umara, Amir-i-Kabir, Khurshid ul-Mulk, Khurshid ud-Daula, Nawab ‘Abu’l Fakhr Muhammad Fakhr ud-din Khan Bahadur, Imam Jang ‘Abu’l Khair Khan III, who was also the Prime Minister of Hyderabad between 1848-1849. The Paigahs built the Falaknauma Palace in Hyderabad. Documentation of Sayyid’s relationship to the Paigah royalty was perserved by his maternal grandfather Nawab Syed Yusufuddin, whose grandfather was the Cheif Justice of Hyderabad. In the 1950’s Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s maternal family sued the Amir i-Paigah Nawab Zahir Yar Jung for their inheritance and won.

Maternal Side: Recognized Nobility

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Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s maternal great grandfather Lord Nawab Sayyid Zia al-Din. Lord Nawab Zia al-Din’s estimated net worth today would be the equivalent of $783 million – $1.1 billion USD. His paternal lineage is traced back to Imam Zayd b. Ali b. Husayn b. Ali b. Abi Talib rahmatullahi alaihi

Sayyid A. Amiruddin's mother's brother, Syed Vicaruddin being granted the distinguished rank of Officer of the Royal Order of Alaouite by Sahib al-Jalalah, ’Amir al-Mu’minin, Nassarahu-Illah; His Majesty Commander of the Faithful, may God grant him victory, the King Mohammed VI of Morocco.

Sayyid A. Amiruddin’s mother’s brother being granted the distinguished rank of Officer of the Royal Order of Alaouite by Sahib al-Jalalah, ’Amir al-Mu’minin, Nassarahu-Illah; His Majesty Commander of the Faithful, may God grant him victory, the King Mohammed VI of Morocco.

Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s mother’s brother being decorated by the Chief Justice of Palestine with the Order of the Star of Jerusalem (Wissam Najm al-Quds) on behalf of H.E. Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas. The Order of the Star of Jerusalem is Palestine’s highest honor

Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin with H.E. the Naqib al-Ashraaf Sayed Ahmad Dhafar al-Jilani, Custodian of the Mosque and Tomb of Ghawth al-Adham Shaykh ‘Abd al-Qadir al-Jilani, Baghdad, Iraq.

H.E. the new Naqib al-Ashraaf al-Shaykh Sayed ‘Abd al-Rahman al-Jilani the Custodian of the Mosque and Tomb of Ghawth al-Adham Shaykh ‘Abd al-Qadir al-Jilani, Baghdad, Iraq visiting Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin’s residence in Hyderabad

With H.E. Pir Salman Gailani, grandson of Naqib al-Ashraf Pir Syed Ibrahim Saif al-Din al-Jilani.

With H.E. Pir Salman al-Gailani, son of the venerable Pir Syed Najmuddin al-Gailani and grandson of H.E. Naqib al-Ashraf fi Dar el-Islam Pir Syed Ibrahim Saif al-Din al-Jilani, Sajjadah Nashin and Mutawali of the Mosque and Tomb of Sultan ul-Awliya Ghawth al-Adham Shaykh ‘Abd al-Qadir al-Jilani, Baghdad, Iraq

Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin at the Falaknauma Palace, built by the Amir-i Paigah in Hyderabad

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9 comments on “Bloodline & Family Lineage

  1. Syed Wasiuddin Hasan
    November 18, 2013

    Asalam o Elekum.

    Jazak Allah. Baba Jan died about eight years back in Islamabad and burried there. If I could express my feeling, it is as if I have seen him again.
    I have been working on this for almost 3-4 months day and nights on weekends and asking details from my senior relatives forseveral years.
    I have been given a hand written brief shijra for reference perhaps that would add further value into your record.
    I shall continue my research work on Shijra Mubarak and try to expand it if Allah permits. Insha Allah. I wish if you stay in touch with me and my family.
    Please remember us in your prayers and convey my Qadambosi and Aadab o Salam to Walida Majida. I am sure she must be delighted to learn that as I share the same blood.
    May Allah and His Prophet smile upon you.

    Regards

    Syed Wasiuddin Hasan

    • ASFC
      November 18, 2013

      Amazing, I have added you to my Facebook account. I look forward to bring in touch. Would love to see a scan/photo of the brief hand written Shajra you have. I am currently in Hyderabad, at my Nana’s house, so your timing couldn’t have been better! Great! I am also very happy you reached out to me 😀

  2. Ali Hidoussi
    March 5, 2014

    Al salom alikaom,
    I am sending you this email regarding a topic that interests me personally. When I went back to my home country last summer. I have met an elderly of my family and he showed me a journal of one of our ancestors. the journal contained our family tree. I have copy of one of the pages shows my family tree. the original copy is in his possession back in my home country. I want to know if the tree is authentic or not. Can you please help regarding this matter.

    • ASFC
      March 5, 2014

      Wa alaikum as salam. Sure, I would love to see it. Welcome.

  3. Zafar
    September 7, 2015

    Bi Ismuka ALLOHUMA
    I am very touched to see the Holy Linage of Saidna Ahmed Ameruddin is connected with our Nizari Ismaili Imams (Salavat Allahy Anhum)

  4. shaybilnana
    February 16, 2016

    As-salamu aleykum,

    I was looking for informations about my ancestry and I have ended up here. I am an Al-Ikhlassy from Aleppo in Syria and a relative told me a long time ago that Al-Ikhlassy is an ashraf family, and that we had a genealogic tree in Syria but I didn’t paid more attention. Now I want to know more but I can’t because of the war. Have you ever heard about ashraf families in Syria? And how could I learn more about my family?

    • ASFC
      March 4, 2016

      My maternal grandmothers family is from Hama, hence the title Hamawi. They descended from Sayyid Saifuddin Abu Zakariyya Yahya-Al- Hamawi Wa Baghdadi who migrated to Syria from Baghdad. he wa sthe son of Sayyid Zahiruddin al-Baghdadi, son of Sayyid Abu Nasr Shamsuddin, son of Sayyid Imaduddin Abi Saleh Nasr Qadiri, son of Sayyid Al Aqtab Sayyid Shah Tajuddin ‘Abdur Razack Qadiri, son of Qutb Al ‘Arifeen, son of Ghawth al-Adham al-Sayyid al-Sharif Shaykh Muhiuddin Abi Muhammad Abdul Qadir Jilani al-Hasani al-Husayni radiAllahu ‘anhu. The famous Abdul Qader Husni al-Keilani al-Hasani (1874–1948) a Syrian nationalist, statesman and religious authority was one of our of relatives in Syria. His Wikipedia page is https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abdul_Qader_al-Keilani

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