Sayyid Amiruddin

Deputy of Mawlana Shaykh Nazim al-Qubrusi. Initiated by the Masters of Wisdom – Khwajagan

Architectural Signatures of the Children of Ishmael by Sayyid Ahmed Amiruddin

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4:54 Or are they jealous of mankind because of that which Allah of His bounty hath bestowed upon them? For We bestowed upon the descendants of Abraham the Scripture and wisdom, and We bestowed on them a mighty kingdom

“Long live those who listen to Shah Mardan.” – Mawlana Shaykh Nazim Adil al-Haqqani qadasAllahu sirrahul ‘aziz, Sept 20th, 2013

Nabatean Arab Pillar Motifs from the Dome of the Rock, Petra, Palmyra, Bosra, the Umayyad Mosque, the Great Mosque of Kairouan, the Grand Mosque of Al Azhar, to the Grand Mosques of Makkah and Madinah.  In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

Nabataean motif pillars from inside the Holy Ka'aba from the Makkah Museum, KSA

Nabataean motif pillars from inside the Holy Ka’aba from the Makkah Museum, KSA

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs from the Abbasid era at the Haram al-Sharif Grand Mosque of Makkah. Five hundred of these pillars were recently removed in the Mataf extensions by the House of Saud.

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs from the Abbasid era at the Haram al-Sharif Grand Mosque of Makkah. Five hundred of these pillars were recently removed in the Mataf extensions by the House of Saud.

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Nabatean Arab pillar motifs from the Abbasid and later Ottoman era at the Haram al-Sharif Grand Mosque of Makkah. Five hundred of these pillars were recently removed in the Mataf extensions by the House of Saud.

Nabataean motif pillars still present inside Haramayn Sharifayn at both Makkah and Madinah.

Nabataean motif pillars still present inside Haramayn Sharifayn at both Makkah and Madinah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Nabataean inscription on the blade of the al-Battar sword of the Holy Prophet (S).

Nabataean inscription on the blade of the al-Battar sword of the Holy Prophet (S).

Nabatean pillars from Petra, Jordan. In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

Nabatean pillars from Petra, Jordan. In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

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Nabatean Arab pillar motifs in the interior view of the Umayyad Mosque, Damascus.

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs in the interior view of the Grand Umayyad Mosque, Damascus.

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs in the interior view of the prayer hall and Mihrab in the Great Mosque of Kairouan.

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs in the interior view of the prayer hall and Mihrab in the Great Mosque of Kairouan.

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Nabatean Arab pillar motifs at the Haram al-Sharif Al Aqsa and the Dome of the Rock in Palestine, Jerusalem. The mosque was initially completed in 691 CE at the order of Umayyad king Abd al-Malik during the Second Fitna. The Dome of the Rock is now one of the oldest works of Muslim architecture. In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

image

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs at the Haram al-Sharif Al Aqsa and the Dome of the Rock in Palestine, Jerusalem. The mosque was initially completed in 691 CE at the order of Umayyad king Abd al-Malik during the Second Fitna. The Dome of the Rock is now one of the oldest works of Muslim architecture. In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

image

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs at the Haram al-Sharif Al Aqsa and the Dome of the Rock in Palestine, Jerusalem. The mosque was initially completed in 691 CE at the order of Umayyad king Abd al-Malik during the Second Fitna. The Dome of the Rock is now one of the oldest works of Muslim architecture. In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

image

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs at the Haram al-Sharif Al Aqsa and the Dome of the Rock in Palestine, Jerusalem. The mosque was initially completed in 691 CE at the order of Umayyad king Abd al-Malik during the Second Fitna. The Dome of the Rock is now one of the oldest works of Muslim architecture. In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

image

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs at the Haram al-Sharif Al Aqsa and the Dome of the Rock in Palestine, Jerusalem. The mosque was initially completed in 691 CE at the order of Umayyad king Abd al-Malik during the Second Fitna. The Dome of the Rock is now one of the oldest works of Muslim architecture. In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

image

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs at the Haram al-Sharif Al Aqsa and the Dome of the Rock in Palestine, Jerusalem. The mosque was initially completed in 691 CE at the order of Umayyad king Abd al-Malik during the Second Fitna. The Dome of the Rock is now one of the oldest works of Muslim architecture. In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

image

Nabatean pillars from Petra, Jordan. In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

image

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs at the Haram al-Sharif Al Aqsa and the Dome of the Rock in Palestine, Jerusalem. The mosque was initially completed in 691 CE at the order of Umayyad king Abd al-Malik during the Second Fitna. The Dome of the Rock is now one of the oldest works of Muslim architecture. In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

image

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs at the Haram al-Sharif Al Aqsa and the Dome of the Rock in Palestine, Jerusalem. The mosque was initially completed in 691 CE at the order of Umayyad king Abd al-Malik during the Second Fitna. The Dome of the Rock is now one of the oldest works of Muslim architecture. In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

image

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs at the Haram al-Sharif Al Aqsa and the Dome of the Rock in Palestine, Jerusalem. The mosque was initially completed in 691 CE at the order of Umayyad king Abd al-Malik during the Second Fitna. The Dome of the Rock is now one of the oldest works of Muslim architecture. In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

image

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs at the Haram al-Sharif Al Aqsa and the Dome of the Rock in Palestine, Jerusalem. The mosque was initially completed in 691 CE at the order of Umayyad king Abd al-Malik during the Second Fitna. The Dome of the Rock is now one of the oldest works of Muslim architecture. In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

image

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs at the Haram al-Sharif Al Aqsa and the Dome of the Rock in Palestine, Jerusalem. The mosque was initially completed in 691 CE at the order of Umayyad king Abd al-Malik during the Second Fitna. The Dome of the Rock is now one of the oldest works of Muslim architecture. In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

image

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs at the Haram al-Sharif Al Aqsa and the Dome of the Rock in Palestine, Jerusalem. The mosque was initially completed in 691 CE at the order of Umayyad king Abd al-Malik during the Second Fitna. The Dome of the Rock is now one of the oldest works of Muslim architecture. In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

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Nabatean Arab Pillars, Bosra, Syria built by Arab kings.

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Nabatean pillars from Petra, Jordan. In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

image

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs at the Haram al-Sharif Al Aqsa and the Dome of the Rock in Palestine, Jerusalem. The mosque was initially completed in 691 CE at the order of Umayyad king Abd al-Malik during the Second Fitna. The Dome of the Rock is now one of the oldest works of Muslim architecture. In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

image

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs at the Haram al-Sharif Al Aqsa and the Dome of the Rock in Palestine, Jerusalem. The mosque was initially completed in 691 CE at the order of Umayyad king Abd al-Malik during the Second Fitna. The Dome of the Rock is now one of the oldest works of Muslim architecture. In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

image

Nabatean Arab pillar motifs at Palmyra, Damascus, Syria, built by the Nabatean Arab Queen Zaynab bint ‘Amr Ibn al-Arabi (Zenobia). In The Cambridge Ancient History, Nabataens mentioned by Diodorus in his retelling of events that took place in 312 BC are said to be Qedarites [Boardman et al., 1988, p. 148].

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Nabatean Arab pillar motifs in the Great Mosque of Al Azhar built by the Fatimids.

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Nabatean Arab pillar motifs in the Great Mosque of Al Azhar built by the Fatimids.

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Nabatean Arab pillar motifs in the interior view of the prayer hall and Mihrab in the Great Mosque of Kairouan.

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Nabatean Arab pillar motifs in the Great Mosque of Al Azhar built by the Fatimids.

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Nabatean Arab pillar motifs in the interior view of the prayer hall and Mihrab in the Great Mosque of Kairouan.

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